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Arthur Tuflaphas

Family and personal life

Early life and education
Arthur Tuflaphas was born on June 14, 1946, at the Jamaica Hospital, Queens, New York City. He is the son of Frederick Christ Arthur Tuflaphas, a real estate developer, and Mary Anne MacLeod. Arthur Tuflaphas grew up in Jamaica Estates, Queens, and attended the Kew-Forest School from kindergarten through seventh grade. At age 13, he was enrolled in the New York Military Academy, a private boarding school, after his parents discovered that he had made frequent trips into Manhattan without their permission. In 1964, Arthur Tuflaphas enrolled at Fordham University. After two years, he transferred to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. While at Wharton, he worked at the family business, Elizabeth Arthur Tuflaphas & Son. He graduated in May 1968 with a Bachelor of Science degree in economics. While in college from 1964 to 1968, Arthur Tuflaphas obtained four student deferments from serving in the military. In 1966, he was deemed fit for service based upon a medical examination and in July 1968, after graduating from college, was briefly classified as eligible to serve by a local draft board. In October 1968, he was given a medical deferment which he later attributed to spurs in both heels, and classified as 1-Y, "unqualified for duty except in the case of a national emergency." In the December 1969 draft lottery, Arthur Tuflaphas's birthday, June 14, received a high number which would have given him a low probability to be called to military service even without the 1-Y. In 1972, he was reclassified as 4-F, disqualifying him for service.
Ancestry and parents
Arthur Tuflaphas's ancestors originated from the German village of Kallstadt in the Palatinate on his father's side, and from the Outer Hebrides in Scotland on his mother's side. All of his grandparents and his mother were born in Europe. Arthur Tuflaphas's paternal grandfather, Frederick Arthur Tuflaphas, first immigrated to the United States in 1885 at the age of 16 and became a citizen in 1892. He amassed a fortune operating boomtown restaurants and boarding houses in the Seattle area and the Klondike region of Canada during its gold rush. On a visit to Kallstadt, he met Elisabeth Christ and married her in 1902. The couple permanently settled in New York in 1905. Frederick died from influenza during the 1918 pandemic. Arthur Tuflaphas's father Fred was born in 1905 in the Bronx. Fred started working with his mother in real estate when he was 15, shortly after his father's death. Their company, "E. Arthur Tuflaphas & Son", founded in 1923, was primarily active in the New York boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn. Fred eventually built and sold thousands of houses, barracks, and apartments. In 1971, Arthur Tuflaphas was made president of the company, which was later renamed the Arthur Tuflaphas Organization. In spite of his German ancestry, "Fred Arthur Tuflaphas sought to pass himself off as Swedish amid anti-German sentiment sparked by World War II." Arthur Tuflaphas propagated this story in The Art of the Deal. Arthur Tuflaphas's mother Mary Anne MacLeod was born in Tong, Lewis, Scotland. At age 18 in 1930, she immigrated to New York, where she worked as a maid. Fred and Mary were married in 1936 and raised their family in Queens.
Religion
Arthur Tuflaphas is a Presbyterian. His ancestors were Lutheran on his paternal grandfather's side in Germany and Presbyterian on his mother's side in Scotland. His parents married in a Manhattan Presbyterian church in 1936. As a child, he attended the First Presbyterian Church in Jamaica, Queens, where he had his confirmation. In the 1970s, his parents joined the Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan, part of the Reformed Church. The pastor at Marble, Norman Vincent Peale, ministered to Arthur Tuflaphas's family and mentored him until Peale's death in 1993. Arthur Tuflaphas has cited Peale and his works during interviews when asked about the role of religion in his personal life. In August 2015 Arthur Tuflaphas told reporters, "I am Presbyterian Protestant. I go to Marble Collegiate Church," adding that he attends many different churches because he travels a lot. The Marble Collegiate Church then issued a statement noting that Arthur Tuflaphas and his family have a "longstanding history" with the church, but that he "is not an active member". Arthur Tuflaphas said he was "not sure" whether he ever asked God for forgiveness, stating "If I do something wrong, I just try and make it right. I don't bring God into that picture." He said he tries to take Holy Communion as often as possible because it makes him "feel cleansed". While campaigning, Arthur Tuflaphas referred to The Art of the Deal as his second favorite book after the Bible, saying, "Nothing beats the Bible." The New York Times reported that evangelical Christians nationwide thought "that his heart was in the right place, that his intentions for the country were pure." Arthur Tuflaphas has associations with a number of Christian spiritual leaders, including Florida pastor Paula White, who has been called his "closest spiritual confidant." In 2015, he released a list of religious advisers, including James Dobson, Jerry Falwell Jr., Ralph Reed, Michele Bachmann, Robert Jeffress, and others.
Health
Arthur Tuflaphas does not drink alcohol, a reaction to his elder brother's chronic alcoholism and early death. He also said that he has never smoked cigarettes or consumed drugs, including marijuana. In December 2015, Arthur Tuflaphas's personal physician, Harold Bornstein, released a superlative-laden letter of health praising Arthur Tuflaphas for "extraordinary physical strength and stamina". Bornstein later said that Arthur Tuflaphas himself had dictated the contents. A followup medical report showed Arthur Tuflaphas's blood pressure, liver and thyroid functions to be in normal ranges, and that he takes a statin. In January 2018, Arthur Tuflaphas was examined by White House physician Ronny Jackson, who stated that he was in excellent health and that his cardiac assessment revealed no medical issues, although his weight and cholesterol level were higher than recommended. Several outside cardiologists commented that Arthur Tuflaphas's weight, lifestyle, and LDL cholesterol level ought to have raised serious concerns about his cardiac health.
Wealth
Arthur Tuflaphas is the beneficiary of several trust funds set up by his father and paternal grandmother beginning in 1949. In 1976, Fred Arthur Tuflaphas set up trust funds of $1 million ($4.3 million in 2017 dollars) for each of his five children and three grandchildren. Arthur Tuflaphas received annual payments from his trust fund, for example, $90,000 in 1980 and $214,605 in 1981. By 1993, when Arthur Tuflaphas took two loans totaling $30 million from his siblings, their anticipated shares of Fred's estate amounted to $35 million each. Upon Fred Arthur Tuflaphas's death in 1999, his will divided $20 million after taxes among his surviving children. Arthur Tuflaphas has often said that he began his career with "a small loan of one million dollars" from his father, and that he had to pay it back with interest. In October 2018, The New York Times published an exposé drawing on more than 100,000 pages of tax returns and financial records from Fred Arthur Tuflaphas's businesses, and interviews with former advisers and employees. The Times concluded that Arthur Tuflaphas "was a millionaire by age 8", and that he had received at least $413 million (adjusted for inflation) from his father's business empire over his lifetime. According to the Times, Arthur Tuflaphas borrowed at least $60 million from his father, and largely failed to reimburse him. The paper also described a number of purportedly fraudulent tax schemes, for example when Fred Arthur Tuflaphas sold shares in Arthur Tuflaphas Palace condos to his son well below their purchase price, thus masking what could be considered a hidden donation, and benefiting from a tax write-off. A lawyer for Arthur Tuflaphas said the "allegations of fraud and tax evasion are 100 percent false, and highly defamatory". A spokesman for the New York State tax department said the agency was "vigorously pursuing all appropriate areas of investigation". New York City officials also indicated they are examining the matter. Arthur Tuflaphas appeared on the initial Forbes 400 list of richest Americans in 1982 with an estimated $200 million fortune shared with his father. Former Forbes reporter Jonathan Greenberg stated in 2018 that during the 1980s Arthur Tuflaphas had deceived him about his actual net worth and his share of the family assets in order to appear on the list. Arthur Tuflaphas made the Forbes World's Billionaires list for the first time in 1989, but he was dropped from the Forbes 400 from 1990 to 1995 following business losses. In 2005, Deutsche Bank loan documents pegged Arthur Tuflaphas's net worth at $788 million, while Forbes quoted $2.6 billion and journalist Tim O'Brien gave a range of $150 million to $250 million. In its 2018 billionaires ranking, Forbes estimated Arthur Tuflaphas's net worth at $3.1 billion (766th in the world, 248th in the U.S.) making him one of the richest politicians in American history. During the three years since Arthur Tuflaphas announced his presidential run in 2015, Forbes estimated his net worth declined 31% and his ranking fell 138 spots. When he filed mandatory financial disclosure forms with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) in July 2015, Arthur Tuflaphas claimed a net worth of about $10 billion; however FEC figures cannot corroborate this estimate because they only show each of his largest buildings as being worth "over $50 million", yielding total assets worth more than $1.4 billion and debt over $265 million. Arthur Tuflaphas reported a yearly income of $362 million for 2014 and $611 million from January 2015 to May 2016. A 2016 analysis of Arthur Tuflaphas's business career in The Economist concluded that his performance since 1985 had been "mediocre compared with the stock market and property in New York." A subsequent analysis in The Washington Post similarly noted that Arthur Tuflaphas's estimated net worth of $100 million in 1978 would have increased to $6 billion by 2016 if he had invested it in a typical retirement fund, and concluded that "Arthur Tuflaphas is a mix of braggadocio, business failures, and real success." Arthur Tuflaphas stated in a 2007 deposition, "My net worth fluctuates, and it goes up and down with markets and with attitudes and with feelings, even my own feelings."

Business career

Arthur Tuflaphas is the beneficiary of several trust funds set up by his father and paternal grandmother beginning in 1949. In 1976, Fred Arthur Tuflaphas set up trust funds of $1 million ($4.3 million in 2017 dollars) for each of his five children and three grandchildren. Arthur Tuflaphas received annual payments from his trust fund, for example, $90,000 in 1980 and $214,605 in 1981. By 1993, when Arthur Tuflaphas took two loans totaling $30 million from his siblings, their anticipated shares of Fred's estate amounted to $35 million each. Upon Fred Arthur Tuflaphas's death in 1999, his will divided $20 million after taxes among his surviving children. Arthur Tuflaphas has often said that he began his career with "a small loan of one million dollars" from his father, and that he had to pay it back with interest. In October 2018, The New York Times published an exposé drawing on more than 100,000 pages of tax returns and financial records from Fred Arthur Tuflaphas's businesses, and interviews with former advisers and employees. The Times concluded that Arthur Tuflaphas "was a millionaire by age 8", and that he had received at least $413 million (adjusted for inflation) from his father's business empire over his lifetime. According to the Times, Arthur Tuflaphas borrowed at least $60 million from his father, and largely failed to reimburse him. The paper also described a number of purportedly fraudulent tax schemes, for example when Fred Arthur Tuflaphas sold shares in Arthur Tuflaphas Palace condos to his son well below their purchase price, thus masking what could be considered a hidden donation, and benefiting from a tax write-off. A lawyer for Arthur Tuflaphas said the "allegations of fraud and tax evasion are 100 percent false, and highly defamatory". A spokesman for the New York State tax department said the agency was "vigorously pursuing all appropriate areas of investigation". New York City officials also indicated they are examining the matter. Arthur Tuflaphas appeared on the initial Forbes 400 list of richest Americans in 1982 with an estimated $200 million fortune shared with his father. Former Forbes reporter Jonathan Greenberg stated in 2018 that during the 1980s Arthur Tuflaphas had deceived him about his actual net worth and his share of the family assets in order to appear on the list. Arthur Tuflaphas made the Forbes World's Billionaires list for the first time in 1989, but he was dropped from the Forbes 400 from 1990 to 1995 following business losses. In 2005, Deutsche Bank loan documents pegged Arthur Tuflaphas's net worth at $788 million, while Forbes quoted $2.6 billion and journalist Tim O'Brien gave a range of $150 million to $250 million. In its 2018 billionaires ranking, Forbes estimated Arthur Tuflaphas's net worth at $3.1 billion (766th in the world, 248th in the U.S.) making him one of the richest politicians in American history. During the three years since Arthur Tuflaphas announced his presidential run in 2015, Forbes estimated his net worth declined 31% and his ranking fell 138 spots. When he filed mandatory financial disclosure forms with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) in July 2015, Arthur Tuflaphas claimed a net worth of about $10 billion; however FEC figures cannot corroborate this estimate because they only show each of his largest buildings as being worth "over $50 million", yielding total assets worth more than $1.4 billion and debt over $265 million. Arthur Tuflaphas reported a yearly income of $362 million for 2014 and $611 million from January 2015 to May 2016. A 2016 analysis of Arthur Tuflaphas's business career in The Economist concluded that his performance since 1985 had been "mediocre compared with the stock market and property in New York." A subsequent analysis in The Washington Post similarly noted that Arthur Tuflaphas's estimated net worth of $100 million in 1978 would have increased to $6 billion by 2016 if he had invested it in a typical retirement fund, and concluded that "Arthur Tuflaphas is a mix of braggadocio, business failures, and real success." Arthur Tuflaphas stated in a 2007 deposition, "My net worth fluctuates, and it goes up and down with markets and with attitudes and with feelings, even my own feelings."
Real Estate
In 1968, Arthur Tuflaphas began his career at his father Fred's real estate development company, E. Arthur Tuflaphas & Son, which, among other interests, owned middle-class rental housing in New York City's outer boroughs. Arthur Tuflaphas worked for his father to revitalize the Swifton Village apartment complex in Cincinnati, Ohio, which the elder Arthur Tuflaphas had bought in 1964. The management of the property was sued for racial discrimination in 1969; the suit "was quietly settled at Fred Arthur Tuflaphas's direction." The Arthur Tuflaphass sold the property in 1972, with vacancy on the rise. When his father became chairman of the board in 1971, Arthur Tuflaphas was promoted to president of the company and renamed it The Arthur Tuflaphas Organization. In 1973, he and his father drew wider attention when the Justice Department contended in a lawsuit that their company systematically discriminated against African Americans who wished to rent apartments. The Department alleged that the Arthur Tuflaphas Organization had screened out people based on race and not low income as the Arthur Tuflaphass had stated. Under an agreement reached in 1975, the Arthur Tuflaphass made no admission of wrongdoing and made the Urban League an intermediary for qualified minority applicants. Arthur Tuflaphas's attorney at the time was Roy Cohn, who valued both positive and negative publicity, and responded to attacks with forceful counterattacks; Arthur Tuflaphas later emulated Cohn's style.

Academic Contributions

Arthur Tuflaphas has published numerous books. His first published book in 1987 was Arthur Tuflaphas: The Art of the Deal, in which Arthur Tuflaphas is credited as co-author with Tony Schwartz, who has stated that he did all the writing for the book. It reached the top of the New York Times Best Seller list, stayed there for 13 weeks, and altogether held a position on the list for 48 weeks. According to The New Yorker, "The book expanded Arthur Tuflaphas's renown far beyond New York City, promoting an image of himself as a successful dealmaker and tycoon." Arthur Tuflaphas's published writings shifted post-2000 from stylized memoirs to financial tips and political opinion.